Share:

Superstore employee finds another nail in potatoes

Police in Maritimes investigate complaints about metal objects in spuds

A grocery store employee sorting through a bag of recalled potatoes is the latest person to find a nail in a russet potato sold under the Farmer’s Market brand.

Police say the discovery was made at an Atlantic Superstore on Quinpool Road in Halifax. The employee turned over the potato, nail and remaining bag of potatoes to police.

The potatoes had been recalled after consumers found other spuds with metal in them in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency announced the recall on some potatoes sold in Atlantic Canada on Saturday after police received multiple complaints.

The recalled products are Farmer’s Market russet potatoes in five, ten and 15-pound bags, Strang’s Produce potatoes in five, ten, and 15-pound bags and Strang’s Chef jumbo potatoes for chips in 50-pound bags.

The Farmer’s Market brand is a Loblaw private label brand.

Last week the RCMP in New Brunswick said potatoes with nails in them had been handed over to police in the Maritimes, with the latest incidents occurring in northern New Brunswick.

The Mounties in New Brunswick said in a news release that one of the spuds was reported to police by a Tabusintac resident on Thursday, and was purchased at the local co-op on May 13.

Another was purchased at the Petit-Rocher Inter Marche and provided to police on Tuesday.

The RCMP in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia had already said they have received potatoes with nails in them that were packaged under the Farmer’s Market name.

Sgt. Al LeBlanc, an RCMP spokesman in Nova Scotia, said one potato with a nail in it was purchased from an Atlantic Superstore in Antigonish in late April or early May and was provided to police on Tuesday.

He said another Farmer’s Market potato was purchased at a No Frills in Barrington Passage, N.S., and was provided to police on Wednesday.

Share:
YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

Loblaw’s campaign celebrates connections through food

Two-and-a-half minute film is the most-viewed video in Loblaw history